postcardsfromwashington:

CANOE AND DECEPTION PASS BRIDGES. - Deception Pass State Park is the most beautiful salt-water recreational area in Washington’s state park system. All types of tourist accommodations are available.

Published by J. Boyd Ellis, Arlington, Washington

Happy TBT!

mypubliclands:

Did you say FREE?
Yep. FREE. Just in time for the hiking season, we’ve got free maps of many of the spectacular BLM-Oregon/Washington wilderness areas available online for YOU! Want to download a shiny new wilderness map? Sure you do, it’s easy. Just click right HERE!
…
These maps will allow you to plan your trip, navigate the wilderness, and enjoy its solitude and splendor. Before you head out to this area be sure you know how to use a map and compass. To learn a little more about map and compass navigation check out our video on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1gCUXQo!
-BLM-Oregon/Washington


Let’s go!

mypubliclands:

Did you say FREE?

Yep. FREE. Just in time for the hiking season, we’ve got free maps of many of the spectacular BLM-Oregon/Washington wilderness areas available online for YOU! Want to download a shiny new wilderness map? Sure you do, it’s easy. Just click right HERE!

These maps will allow you to plan your trip, navigate the wilderness, and enjoy its solitude and splendor. Before you head out to this area be sure you know how to use a map and compass. To learn a little more about map and compass navigation check out our video on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1gCUXQo!

-BLM-Oregon/Washington

Let’s go!

Via
EPSON Perfection V500
For this Throwback Thursday, a classic postcard of one of our iconic waterfalls!

For this Throwback Thursday, a classic postcard of one of our iconic waterfalls!

fidalgoisland:

North Cascades, Washington State

fidalgoisland:

North Cascades, Washington State

birdandmoon:

Whew, done! Here’s a poster of western North American bird sound mnemonics. This one and my eastern one are in my store. Original is on my site here.

An adorable and helpful guide for identifying bird songs.

birdandmoon:

Whew, done! Here’s a poster of western North American bird sound mnemonics. This one and my eastern one are in my store. Original is on my site here.

An adorable and helpful guide for identifying bird songs.

Breaking it down: What does LWCF reauthorization mean for your great outdoors?

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Washington’s astounding beauty is a part of your daily life, but a picturesque future for the outdoors hangs in the balance in Congress.

Our nation’s best tool to protect national and local parks, wildlife refuges, and working forests and range lands is set to sunset — or expire — in 2015 unless Congress renews it.

We cannot let this program fade away. Many communities still lack access to close-to-home outdoor recreation, changing climate threatens access to national parks and the preservation of treasured landscapes, and working lands risk being lost to incompatible development; LWCF funds are needed across the nation to fulfill local priorities. 

The diverse benefits of this program are apparent right here in our home state from future and past projects like these recently funded efforts:

Read More

North Central Washington leaders celebrate the outdoors with the Coalition

A congressman, two state legislators, a mayor and seven outdoor industry leaders walk into a room.

It’s not the start to a bad joke - its the basis for a great conversation about the impact of the outdoors on our economy, and really happened at Pybus Public Market in Wenatchee on Friday, March 21.

More than 70 outdoor enthusiasts whose businesses, employees and families benefit from the outdoors gathered to collaborate and hear remarks from Congressman Dave Reichert (top and bottom right photo), State Representative Brad Hawkins, State Senator Linda Evans Parlette (top photo), and Coalition Chair Peter Dykstra (bottom left photo).

Each remarked on how their ethic for conservation started in childhood — Parlette after spending years fishing with her dad, and Reichert who recalled vivid memories of playing in streams that lead to Lake Washington.

The event was co-hosted by Confluence Health, Chelan-Douglas Land Trust, the North Central Washington Economic Development District, Plum Creek, Trout Unlimited, The Trust for Public Land, Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition, and the Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce.

These seemingly disparate groups are all stakeholders in the outdoors, whether it is through sales of outdoor gear or using the outdoors as a recruiting tool to bring top employees to the region.

Thanks to all who joined us and started the conversation about how we can use our natural heritage to support our communities.

Could the President’s budget protect one of your favorite places?
The Coalition is very excited to see that the Obama Administration’s recently released 2015 budget proposes full, permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).
The budget restores the promise that a small portion of the revenues derived from offshore oil and gas development are used to make strategic investments to protect America’s irreplaceable natural, historic and recreational outdoor places. $900 million is meant to go toward the LWCF each year, but it has only been fully funded once in its 50-year history.

For Fiscal Year 2014, the program received $306 million nationally.
Projects proposed for funding in the President’s budget in Washington state include:
Olympic National Park – Grays Harbor County
$5.22 million to protect lakeshore properties along Lake Quinault in Olympic National Park. Development is threatening water quality and adversely affecting fish spawning beds, as well as the visitor experience.
South Puget Sound Coastal Forest (Forest Legacy Program) – Mason County
$4 million to preserve a working tree farm on Hood Canal that will protect the local shellfish industry and ensure greater public access to regional forests and trails.
Pysht Coastal Forest Phase 2 (Forest Legacy Program) – Clallam County
$2 million to protect habitat and salmon spawning streams along the Strait of Juan de Fuca and preserve working forest jobs.
Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail – Stevens County
$2.7 million to conserve grizzly bear and Canadian lynx habitat while filling in a 2.5 mile gap of the Pacific Northwest Trail along Big Sheep Creek.
Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail – King County
$2.8 million for trail, resource, and watershed protection through the populous King County enabling increased public use and recreation.
Washington Cascades-Yakima River Watershed / Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest – Kittitas County
$2.7 million to protect lands in the Naches watershed and Keechelus-Kachess area of the Central Cascades, to ensure properties are available for recreational opportunities, habitat preservation, water quality protection, and improved forest management against wildfires and pests.
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge – Clark County
$500,000 to preserve historical resources along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and allow 13 listed salmon and steelhead stocks to reverse their downward population trend in the Columbia watershed.
Willapa National Wildlife Refuge – Pacific County
$1 million to protect Willapa Bay frontage, two miles of fish bearing streams, 70 acres of emergent and forested salt marsh, and 20 acres of riparian habitats.

Photo by USFWS Pacific Region.

Could the President’s budget protect one of your favorite places?

The Coalition is very excited to see that the Obama Administration’s recently released 2015 budget proposes full, permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).

The budget restores the promise that a small portion of the revenues derived from offshore oil and gas development are used to make strategic investments to protect America’s irreplaceable natural, historic and recreational outdoor places. $900 million is meant to go toward the LWCF each year, but it has only been fully funded once in its 50-year history.

For Fiscal Year 2014, the program received $306 million nationally.

Projects proposed for funding in the President’s budget in Washington state include:

Olympic National Park – Grays Harbor County

$5.22 million to protect lakeshore properties along Lake Quinault in Olympic National Park. Development is threatening water quality and adversely affecting fish spawning beds, as well as the visitor experience.

South Puget Sound Coastal Forest (Forest Legacy Program) – Mason County

$4 million to preserve a working tree farm on Hood Canal that will protect the local shellfish industry and ensure greater public access to regional forests and trails.

Pysht Coastal Forest Phase 2 (Forest Legacy Program) – Clallam County

$2 million to protect habitat and salmon spawning streams along the Strait of Juan de Fuca and preserve working forest jobs.

Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail – Stevens County

$2.7 million to conserve grizzly bear and Canadian lynx habitat while filling in a 2.5 mile gap of the Pacific Northwest Trail along Big Sheep Creek.

Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail – King County

$2.8 million for trail, resource, and watershed protection through the populous King County enabling increased public use and recreation.

Washington Cascades-Yakima River Watershed / Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest – Kittitas County

$2.7 million to protect lands in the Naches watershed and Keechelus-Kachess area of the Central Cascades, to ensure properties are available for recreational opportunities, habitat preservation, water quality protection, and improved forest management against wildfires and pests.

Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge – Clark County

$500,000 to preserve historical resources along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and allow 13 listed salmon and steelhead stocks to reverse their downward population trend in the Columbia watershed.

Willapa National Wildlife Refuge – Pacific County

$1 million to protect Willapa Bay frontage, two miles of fish bearing streams, 70 acres of emergent and forested salt marsh, and 20 acres of riparian habitats.

Photo by USFWS Pacific Region.

Olympia Update: What the heck happened this session?

Despite the short legislative session, the Coalition was working on a number of priority items. We’re pleased to report to you that this session offered some success.

This legislative session, the Coalition had 4 priorities (If wonk-talk puts you straight to sleep, feel free to skim):

Read More

dendroica:

the flowers of spring, part four by manyfires on Flickr.

Happy first day of spring!

dendroica:

the flowers of spring, part four by manyfires on Flickr.

Happy first day of spring!

Outdoor recreation directly supports 227,000 jobs, and consumers generate $22.5 billion in annual spending on things like equipment, lodging and apparel.

Mt. Rainer- Photo Courtesy of Don Pugh

Here are some of our favorite tweets supporting the #OutdoorEconomy

Avoid the winter blues by getting outside

It’s the end of February, a time most people have long abandoned their New Year’s Resolution but you can take a simple step to keep one promise to yourself: getting outdoors more often.

Instead of stressing about a bulging waistline or that looming deadline at work, put on a jacket, go outside and enjoy an area funded by the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program. Chances are there is one within your local area, and the Coalition is working hard to increase that number every day.

Here are some popular picks for winter walks or you can see other options in your county on our website.

Spokane - Spokane River Centennial Trail

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As a pedestrian and bike-friendly trail, users can follow the Spokane River from Riverside State Park onward to the Idaho border. Not only is this a fantastic trail for anything from an afternoon to weekend-long walk, but it is also an excellent example of how trails can revitalize old industrial lands. This pathway features multiple access points, and was created by combining converted roadways, former timber lands and old railway routes.

Asotin - Chief Joseph Wildlife Area- Grande Ronde River


For a desert adventure hike down the old road in the Chief Joseph Wildlife Area, and continue on to the lush riparian area along the Grande Ronde River. If you are fortunate enough to see a wild turkey or Bighorn sheep, be sure to take a photo. Look out for blooming bluebells during the spring season, though stay on the old roads because it is rattlesnake season year round.


Ellensburg - Yakima River Canyon

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If you want to experience one of the most scenic and biologically important areas in Washington, try visiting the Yakima River Canyon. Whether you are looking for a popular hiking trail, or opportunity to explore the area’s unique basalt cliffs Yakima provides a wonderful recreational opportunity.


Leavenworth - Camas Meadows Natural Area Preserve


Consisting of high-quality, lush native habitat the Camas Meadows is a geographical anomaly in the dry eastern Cascade mountains. Do not wander into the meadows, for they are too fragile to explore. Instead stay on the high crest to view rare ecological gems like the endangered Wenatchee mountain checkermallow.


Mount Vernon - Skagit Delta Wetlands


Whether you enjoy kayaking, hunting, or bird watching this critical wetland demonstrates when both fresh and saltwater estuaries come together. The area is home to a wide variety of wildlife from waterfowl and bald eagle to coyote and black-tailed deer. In the winter the area keeps a special treat, with nearly 27,000 snow geese, 300 tundra swans and about 125,000 ducks wintering in the habitat.


Vancouver - Flume Creek Habitat Area


Bordering the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge this habitat area has scenic views of mature upland forests, remnant old growth, and high densities of snags and downed logs. Due to its proximity to the refuge the site is one of the best places in southwest Washington for wildlife viewing, hiking and birdwatching. Visitors can view a variety of creatures from bald eagles and great blue herons to Columbian black-tailed deer and elk.


Port Angeles - Spruce Railroad Trail

As a smaller trail contained within the greater Olympic Discovery Trail, this historic hike skirts along the shores of Lake Crescent. One of the rare trails that permit mountain bikes in the Olympic National Park, it provides scenic views of the lake’s depth and surrounding ridgeline.

San Juan Island - Deadman Bay


Unlike it’s bleak name, this picturesque area provides prime access to the only sandy beach along the western shore of San Juan Island. Visitors can spend the day at the adjoining Lime Kiln State Park, or patiently wait for a glimpse of nearby whales.


Bellingham - Tennant Lake Park and Hovander Homestead Park


With a little something for everyone Lake Tennant helps unite history buffs and ecological enthusiasts alike. On the western shores of the lake, you can find Hovander Homestead Park full of the rich history of pioneer farming. Southward, within Tennant Lake Park, the boardwalk meanders through swamp and marsh habitats, where spectators can view wetland vegetation, birds and wildlife.

Photo credits:

Spokane River Centennial Trail

Chief Joseph Wildlife Area- Grande Ronde River

Yakima River Canyon

Camas Meadows Natural Area Preserve

Skagit Delta Wetlands

Flume Creek Habitat Area

Spruce Railroad Trail

Deadman Bay

Tennant Lake Park and Hovander Homestead Park